Inside view of roofscreen frames on commercial building

A RoofScreen® may be something added to a building to enhance aesthetics, or even make an architectural statement. Or, it could be a plain façade on the back of an old warehouse to satisfy a city ordinance requiring rooftop equipment to be screened. 

Whatever your reason is for needing rooftop screening enclosures, don’t take a chance on a "make it up as you go" installation. Trust a well thought out system designed by seasoned construction and roofing professionals. We know what we’re doing, and we’re not just saying that. We back that claim up with wet stamped engineering and a 20 year warranty!
  

Frames With RotoLock™ Square Base Supports

(Includes frame types SC3, SC5, NC3, NC5)

Frames mounted with our RotoLock™ Square Base attachments are the most common frames we provide. The RotoLock feature allows each pair of assemblies to be adjusted for roof pitch then completely locked in place, creating a moment-resisting frame. This system is ideal for roof structures that have limited ability to resist moment loads (torque) at the roof connections (e.g. open web steel joists).

Our Square Base Supports include specially designed Base Cap Assemblies that counter-flash over the roof flashing boots by 2.4" and include rubber sealing gaskets for the highest quality waterproofing detail possible. 

Click on the red Details button for more information and technical downloads. 

 

 

Frames With Round Post Supports

(Includes frame types SC3R, NC2R)

Frames mounted with our Round Post Supports are more economical but have certain limitations. The Round Posts are adjustable to account for insulation thickness and are easily waterproofed with a standard pipe flashing using the caulk-and-band method. However, this frame type does not reduce the moment loads (torque) at the connection points. This means the roof deck and structure below must be strong enough the overcome those loads (e.g. concrete, wide flange beams, etc.). 

Click on the red Details button for more information and technical downloads. 

Frames Mounted on DryCap™

(frame type NC2D)

When RoofScreen frames (or any other type of rooftop equipment, for that matter) needs to be mounted to wood or steel sleepers or curbs, the right way to do it is with DryCap™. Over the years we grew tired of seeing so many leaks due to fasteners penetrating the tops of sleeper caps, so we invented and patented a better way.

These DryCap mounted frames are simple, economical and provide a watertight method of attaching equipment screens to commercial roofs. Click on the red Details button for more information and technical downloads. 

For a whole page full of information about our DryCap™ System, click here

Wall-Mount Frames

(Includes frame types IWM and EWM)

RoofScreen Wall-Mount frames are designed to mount directly to the inside of a parapet wall or the exterior of a building. The system is very simple with only a few parts, so it is economical and fast to install. We offer two types of attachments: a basic T-Bracket for non waterproofed walls, and a two-piece watertight bracket for walls with roofing and waterproofing membranes or coatings.  

Click on the red Details button for more information and technical downloads.

  • leaking roof penetration and flashing around and I-beam on a flat commercial roof.

    Compare To Structural Steel

    Building an equipment screen with structural steel is one of the most common methods, but it is not without its disadvantages. While they are very strong, there are big concerns about waterproofing and rust. 

    The penetrations into the roof can be difficult to flash properly, and any screw hole or pin hole in the system can let water travel through the hollow sections and right into the building. Typically these systems are welded in place and painted, which will start to rust within a year or two. 

    For a more detailed comparison to structural steel, please see our technical article 5 Types of Equipment Screens Compared

  • Rooftop screen wall framed with steel studs.
    Rooftop screen wall framed with steel studs. Rooftop screen wall framed with steel studs. Rooftop screen wall framed with steel studs. Rooftop screen wall framed with steel studs. Rooftop screen wall framed with steel studs.

    Compare to Steel Studs

    Using steel studs to erect a roof screen is better than using wood framing, but not much better. At least it doesn’t deteriorate like wood. There are multiple problems with this method, but the big question is how to make the roof connections water tight. The typical method is to attach to wood or steel sleepers. Even if you figure out how to attach to a sleeper without causing a leak, which is questionable (unless you use our  DryCap™ sleeper cap system), the sleeper will still block water flow on the roof if not properly designed. 

    For a more detailed comparison to steel stud roof screens, please see our technical article titled 5 Types of Equipment Screens Compared

  • Unattractive unit mounted screens showing above roof line.
    Equipment screen mounted directly on an air conditioner. Equipment screen mounted directly on an air conditioner. Equipment screen mounted directly on an air conditioner.

    Compare to Unit Mounted Screens

    Unit mounted screens attach directly to the air conditioners or other equipment on the rooftop. Their big claim to fame is that they require no roof penetrations. However, they do have to penetrate the outer shell of the roof equipment with mounting screws, which compromises the watertight integrity of the unit. 

    Aesthetically they don’t really look any better than the units themselves since each piece of rooftop equipment is screened separately. RoofScreen Mfg. systems conceal all the units with one streamlined screen that blends with the architecture of the building. 

    For a more in-depth comparison, and to learn about the other problems with unit mounted roof screens, please see our technical article titled 5 Types of Equipment Screens Compared

  • Old deteriorated wood roof screen mounted to commercial roof in pitch pockets.
    Ugly run down panels on old wooden roof screen. Ugly run down panels on old wooden roof screen. Ugly run down panels on old wooden roof screen. Ugly run down panels on old wooden roof screen. Ugly run down panels on old wooden roof screen.

    Compare to Wood Framed Screens

    Building a roof screen using wood framing is about the worst method possible. Wood is heavy, absorbs water and deteriorates very fast. With the constant wind pressure from being up on a roof, the screen will quickly look dilapidated and run down. Waterproofing can also be a big challenge with wood framing. Wood sleepers, even if properly roofed in, can leak from the brackets fastened into the top of the sheet metal cap and cause serious water damage. If you are thinking of using pitch pockets around the wood penetrations, trust us; you'll never keep that from leaking. 

    For a more in-depth comparison to wood roof screens, please see our technical article titled 5 Types of Equipment Screens Compared.  

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